Water On Your Bathroom Floor?

If you’re concerned about some water that you found on your bathroom floor (near your toilet), please rest assured that there are a number of common possible causes for the problem. After you eliminate the most obvious cause (bad aim), consider the following before presuming the problem is with the seal between your toilet and the sewer line. Usually, the issue is less costly than the potentially expensive possibility of wastewater coming up from beneath your toilet.

The Two Best Places To Start

plunger

Condensation: Probably the most common cause for excess water on the floor of a bathroom is water condensing on the outside of the toilet’s tank and dripping onto the floor. This is commonly referred to as the tank “sweating.” Tank condensation/sweat is caused by the difference in temperature of the water inside the tank, which is usually very cold, and the temperature of the air outside the tank in the bathroom, which is often warm and steamy. Tank condensation sometimes occurs more often in the summer months rather than the cold winter months, but can occur any time of year if the conditions are right. There are easy solutions to this type of problem, such as toilet tank liners (which insulate the cold water inside the tank from the humid outside) or anti-sweat toilet tank valves (which mix cold and warm water coming into the tank to reduce the temperature variance inside and outside the toilet tank). Unfortunately, it’s not convenient to confirm the water on your floor is completely an issue of tank condensation/sweat. Basically, you will need to wipe the outside of your tank thoroughly with a towel and then over time, try to visually detect whether or not water is gathering on the outside of the tank again.

Water leaking from inside the toilet tank: Once you’ve confirmed that the problem you’re experiencing is not due to tank condensation, then the next best place to begin would be to eliminate the possibility of you having water leaking from the tank itself. This is a fairly easy thing to check. Start by removing your toilet toilet tank lid (be very careful, because tank lids are extremely fragile, can be heavy and are usually slippery when wet) and add some organic-based coloring (such as food coloring) to your toilet tank water. We even offer color test tablets on our site for this specific purpose! They can be obtained free with any order placed through our web site. Do NOT flush the tank, but instead wait a little while for the tank water to change color and settle. If after a half-hour or so (without flushing the tank) you find the water on your floor to be the same color as the colored water inside your tank, or if you see any colored drips coming from anywhere on your tank, then you’ll know you have water escaping from the toilet’s tank since that IS the only place you have the colored water. The next thing to do would be to identify where the water is coming from. Any cracks in the porcelain tank should be discolored and highlighted by the tinted water. The tinted water will usually help in finding any leaks around the bolts and rubber seals between your tank and bowl or from the foam gasket where the flush valve allows water to enter the bowl.

Water can leak from inside the bowl for a few different reasons. Read more…

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2 thoughts on “Water On Your Bathroom Floor?

  1. Genny

    I have water stains appearing and getting larger on my wall (drywall) corner coming up from the baseboard. Also the baseboard on the same wall side is detaching from the wall at the top and I’ve been finding small black dead bugs (gnats maybe) in my toilet area floor in the mornings. The floor around the toilet seems to be dry, the toilet doesn’t seem to be leaking, but there is brown/orange discoloration on the floor tile around the toilet, toward the walls, on both sides. This is the master bathroom on the ground floor. Do I have a sewer pipeline problem underneath the slab ? Could the long drought have caused the sewer pipes underneath to crack? Also, I was told to find my clean out from the house and I could not find it anywhere around the house. Where do I look for it?

    Reply
    1. theplumbingsupplyco

      This really sounds like something you need a licensed professional plumber to come look at. We can do a lot over the phone to help you find repair parts, but unfortunately, diagnosing plumbing issues like you’re describing is best handled in person.

      Reply

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