Tag Archives: repair parts

10 Tips for Preventing Toilet Troubles

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5 Easy Plumbing New Year’s Resolutions

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Finding American Standard Toilet Parts

Example of an American Standard Roma series one piece toiletAmerican Standard Brands, as it’s known now, can trace its beginnings to 1872, when the first bit that was to become a plumbing fixture empire was purchased. Over the years, the company has expanded, eventually merging with other companies including various sanitaryware companies like Porcher, Jado, Crane (previously Universal Rundle), and Eljer. These brands are, at the time of this writing, still marketed as separate brands, though virtually all customer service functions have been consolidated under the American Standard Brands banner.

What does this mean for you? Surprisingly, not as much as you might think. Sanitaryware companies have come and gone, merged and spun off since the first toilet manufacturer produced its first toilet. This is nothing new, though it can be frustrating at times.

But eventually, like all toilets, you encounter a problem. Perhaps it’s just a little leak, but as we all know, little leaks can cause big problems. So, if you’re ready to deal with your little leak before it becomes a huge headache, read on!

Now, for the purpose of this post, we’re assuming you know you have an American Standard toilet but don’t know what replacement parts you need to get it back in perfect working order. That’s where we come in. We’re your source for information and parts – we’ll help you find what you need to know to identify the parts for your particular toilet.

First step, carefully remove the tank lid and set it aside somewhere safe. A broken tank lid will only add to your toilet issues, so let’s not go there right now. Though, should you need a replacement lid, we can certainly help you!

Second step, look inside your tank. Lots of interesting stuff, right? Some of the parts probably even look like things you’ve seen on the store shelves.

Photo of an American Standard acutating unit (flush valve) model 47086Here’s where it can get tricky. Some American Standard toilet parts are easily replaceable by “universal” or non-OEM parts as they are fairly standard styles. However, some American Standard toilet parts are unique to a particular model and won’t be so easily replaced.

So, while you’re looking in the tank, see if you can find letters or numbers impressed into the side of the porcelain tank. We’re looking for model numbers, and American Standard model numbers typically have four digits, most often starting with a 2 or a 4. This will be your tank number or your toilet model number, and will determine what toilet parts will fit properly and work the way the manufacturer intended.

Example of a hand painted American Standard toilet tank lidIf you don’t see anything on the inside of your tank, try looking on the unfinished underside of the tank lid – again, very carefully. The model numbers are often repeated on the tank lid, sometimes with additional number/letter combinations and even dates!

Once you have those numbers, you can begin the hunt for the right parts. We show parts breakdowns for many American Standard toilets on our site, and offer a wide variety of replacement toilet parts, from the old actuators to the newer flush valves. We’ll help find what works for your toilet. Even if we don’t list it, we can probably get it or recommend a good replacement for a discontinued part.

Once you have the parts you need, the fix is as good as done. Take an afternoon, call a friend, order pizza and get that toilet taken care of! Oh, and just in case you ever need the info again, make sure you keep your parts list in a safe place.

Your turn:  What’s your best/worst toilet repair story?

Uniquely American Standard

American Standard is a well-known brand name. It seems like all the stores carry them, everyone’s heard of them, and quite a few of you probably have a toilet with the American Standard logo printed on it proudly.

As with all toilet manufacturers, American Standard toilets have some parts that look familiar and some that are completely different. If you’ve ever looked inside the tank of your American Standard toilet, you may have seen something that looks like this:
Example of an American Standard actuator style flush valve

Kinda funny looking, isn’t it? This particular style of American Standard flush valve screws in like most flush valves, but has an “actuating unit” in place of a chain and flapper. An actuator is basically a flapper and a float all in one. The barrel-shaped portions are hollow to various degrees to fit the particular toilet’s flushing needs. Actuators are also typically operated by a push button instead of the more familiar trip lever.

One style of actuator button: Example of an American Standard actuator button

One style of trip lever: Example of an American Standard trip lever, shown in white

American Standard also uses the more familiar style of flush valve in some of their toilets, but that mostly came along a little later.

Whether you need an actuator or a standard style flush valve, or even just the flappers and gaskets, we’re here to assist you. We stock a stunningly huge variety of toilet repair parts for a wide selection of brands, including American Standard.

We have been supplying toilet repair parts since the 1970’s (since 1995 online) and have seen toilet manufacturers change, standardize, and reinvent the flush. We know what’s what with toilet parts, and can help you find not only your currently produced part, but quite often we have some of those discontinued parts on hand. If not, well, we can almost always find something that will fit your toilet when all its parts have been discontinued. We’re just cool that way.

So, whether you have an early Devero or a current Cadet, check us out. We have parts breakdowns online, photos of most parts in our warehouse, and a great customer service team who know how to help you find what you need to fix that Lexington or Luxor. We’re always adding to our site, so if you don’t see something, please ask. We’re glad to help.

Your turn: what’s the weirdest OEM toilet repair part you’ve ever seen?